Review: Amanda Knox

Review: Amanda Knox

This review is on the new Netflix documentary on Amanda Knox. I have been following this case since the beginning and I have always been convinced of her innocence. For those without a great grasp on the case, I highly recommend listening to the Generation Why podcast’s episodes on Amanda Knox before watching this documentary to get an understanding of the crime itself.

Watching this documentary, I feel that the filmmakers did a really good job in naming the documentary Amanda Knox and not Meredith Kercher. If you read online forums, you will see some people don’t seem to be happy that the story is focusing on Amanda and not the victim and that there is little coverage on Meredith. Truth be told, that point is correct. However, looking at this documentary in particular, there are only a few select moments were Meredith is mentioned and footage shown of her. They really don’t go into Meredith’s back story a whole lot. This may be a bit of a missed opportunity however this film is decidedly from the perspective of Amanda Knox, hence the title. She is doing the overall narration.

Other people are interviewed for this documentary including the lead investigator, Giuliano Mignini and a member of the press, Nick Pisa, who comes off extremely unlikeable. This documentary is worth watching alone for the insight of how tabloid journalism works. There is one point in the documentary in particular where he is mentioning the fact that he doesn’t check the facts, that he just gets some information from his sources and runs with it because if he doesn’t someone else will first. This was one of the many head shaking moments for me in this documentary.

There is a very convincing side to this case being told here. The filmmakers definitely cast a bit of a light on the lead investigator. Personally, I found some of the investigation quite shady. And I have done a little bit of research on Giuliano Mignini and since the Amanda Knox case, and he has managed to get himself into some more trouble with some of his practices.

There are some interesting things that happen in this documentary that make it worthwhile, however I would caution anyone who watch it to realise this is really the story of Amanda Knox. It’s almost from her perspective and that of her boyfriend at the time, Raffaele Sollecito. And about the court proceedings that happened around this case. This is opposed to a documentary that is about the facts of the case and a drive to the truth. They do present some of the facts and yes, the filmmakers do leave some of the facts out however this is why I’m encouraging you to listen to the Generation Why episodes in the first instance.

One thing this documentary does well is highlighting some of the cultural biases. If there is anything of an undertone in this, I think that it is about cultural biases. You get to see the Italian investigators take on the view of this girl from America and they kind of look down on her for things that are acceptable in America but not in a more religious country like Italy. I found it extremely interesting watching how these cultural biases played out in the media of the case. And watching how the media helps or hinders a case. I think you all know which way that fell here.

This documentary is about 90 minutes long and well worth the watch if you are looking to hear Amanda’s story. If you are looking for a factual account of the events from the start to the end, this is not the documentary for you. If you are looking for a completely unbiased account of the case and looking to hear both sides of the story, this is not the documentary for you.

This documentary isn’t perfect however it is definitely worth 90 minutes of your time. I really do recommend that you give it a watch. As someone who has been invested in this case and enjoys watching true crime documentaries, it is a well shot piece of film while telling a compelling story from the mouths of the people who were directly involved. 

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